Jingdezhen Teaware

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                                            94 Products

                                            • Handmade Wood Fired Kiln Altered Blue Tea CupHandmade Wood Fired Kiln Altered Blue Tea Cup Out of Stock
                                              $33.99

                                              This teacup is baked with firewood and is made of both kiln-fired glaze variations and cracked glaze craft. Because kiln alteration techniques enable an exciting and dynamic way to create different blue colour glazes on this teacup, each teacup is unique and made by hand, with no two being exactly alike. The phenomenon of crystal formation is caused by kiln altered in a cup, commonly known as “crystal flowers”.

                                              Besides that, the unique cracked glaze technique used creates beautiful patterns on the cup’s surface. Over time as it is soaked with tea soup, then resulting variations in the pattern make each piece truly outstanding and add more enjoyment to the tea drinking experience.

                                              Attention:

                                              • Kiln-fired glaze variations are often unpredictable and can result in a wide range of colours from a single firing.
                                              • The porosity of ceramics varies depending on the materials used, the recipe, the pressure applied, the duration of pressure, the thickness of the body, the firing temperature, and the duration of firing. Generally, the finer the porcelain, the smaller the pores, while the coarser the pottery, the larger the pores.
                                              • Since porcelain is made from clay, the amount of iron spots present in the clay varies depending on the mineral content of the soil. These iron spots are harmless and do not affect the use of the porcelain. Removing them would require the use of chemical materials, which can be damaging to high-quality porcelain.
                                              • Handmade products are not perfect, and each piece can have differences in size, shape, colour, and other aspects.
                                            • Carmine Red Si Ting Tea TopCarmine Red Si Ting Tea Top Out of Stock
                                              $45.99

                                              This teapot is made with an iron red glaze which make it looks warm and earthy, glossyand smooth. The main component of this special glaze is iron-containing minerals, such as hematite and ochre. In the production of ceramics, these minerals are mixed with other raw materials and then high temperature fired to form a hard glaze surface.

                                              The teapot with an iron red glaze would be a beautiful and practical addition to any tea lover’s collection, with a timeless appeal that speaks to the rich history and tradition of ceramic art.

                                            • Hand Painted Child Tea CupHand Painted Child Tea Cup
                                              $45.99

                                              The teacup is made from high-quality white mud, giving it a smooth and elegant texture. The surface is covered in a lovely white glaze, which creates a beautiful and glossy finish. The cup is adorned with overglaze colours in two different patterns.

                                              One of the patterns depicts children setting off firecrackers, a symbol of celebration and joy in Chinese culture. The other pattern shows a child with good fortune, representing prosperity and good luck. Both patterns are intricate and detailed, featuring vibrant colours that contrast beautifully against the white background.

                                              Due to being entirely hand-painted, each painting has slight differences.

                                            • Hand Painted Child Tea CupHand Painted Child Tea Cup
                                              $45.99

                                              The teacup is made from high-quality white mud, giving it a smooth and elegant texture. The surface is covered in a lovely white glaze, which creates a beautiful and glossy finish. The cup is adorned with overglaze colours in two different patterns.

                                              One of the patterns depicts children setting off firecrackers, a symbol of celebration and joy in Chinese culture. The other pattern shows a child with good fortune, representing prosperity and good luck. Both patterns are intricate and detailed, featuring vibrant colours that contrast beautifully against the white background.

                                              Due to being entirely hand-painted, each painting has slight differences.

                                            • Hand painted Pi Qiu Hua Lid SaucerHand painted Pi Qiu Hua Lid Saucer
                                              $75.99

                                              This cover is fully hand-painted using the blue and white underglaze technology. It is an essential item for many people when brewing tea. It is used to hold teapot lids, Gaiwan lids, and cup lids. It not only keeps the lids of the teaware clean but also prevents them from wetting the tabletop.

                                              The decorative pattern of Pi Qiu Hua (皮球花), also known as little tuan hua (小团花) or embroidery ball flower, evolved from the traditional tuan hua pattern on porcelain. This pattern has been present since the Sui Dynasty, and it combines abstract and representational elements. It takes various forms, resembling a spherical shape, hence the name Pi Qiu Hua (皮球花).

                                              The decorative patterns on Chinese porcelain always carry auspicious meanings. Since the Pi Qiu Hua pattern originated from tuan hua, it inherits the traditional tuan hua motifs such as tuan long (团龙), tuan feng (团凤), and tuan hua (团花). These traditional motifs symbolize the abundance and beauty of life.

                                              In this lid saucer, the delicate brushstrokes vividly outline the pattern, creating a glossy and elegant appearance. The colours are rich and vibrant, giving the piece a sense of vivid and liveliness.

                                              Note: All are fully handmade, every lid saucer could be slightly different.

                                            • Handmade Heart-shaped Kiln Altered Green Tea CupHandmade Heart-shaped Kiln Altered Green Tea Cup Out of Stock
                                              $29.99

                                              This handmade celadon chicken heart cup features a beautiful green glaze that is created through the kiln-altered baking process. During this process, the temperature and atmosphere inside the kiln are carefully controlled to produce variations in colour and texture on the surface of the pottery.

                                              The resulting green glaze on this cup is a stunning example of the unique and unpredictable effects that can be achieved through this ancient technique. The subtle variations in shade and texture give the cup a natural and organic feel, and the delicate chicken heart shape adds a touch of whimsy and charm.

                                              Crafted with meticulous attention to detail, this cup is entirely handmade and one-of-a-kind. Its smooth, rounded shape feels comfortable in the hand, and the rich, green glaze adds depth and dimension to the surface.

                                              Attention:

                                              • Kiln-fired glaze variations are often unpredictable and can result in a wide range of colours from a single firing.
                                              • The porosity of ceramics varies depending on the materials used, the recipe, the pressure applied, the duration of pressure, the thickness of the body, the firing temperature, and the duration of firing. Generally, the finer the porcelain, the smaller the pores, while the coarser the pottery, the larger the pores.
                                              • Since porcelain is made from clay, the amount of iron spots present in the clay varies depending on the mineral content of the soil. These iron spots are harmless and do not affect the use of the porcelain. Removing them would require the use of chemical materials, which can be damaging to high-quality porcelain.
                                              • Handmade products are not perfect, and each piece can have differences in size, shape, colour, and other aspects.
                                            • Hand Painted Sunflowers Lid SaucerHand Painted Sunflowers Lid Saucer
                                              $75.99

                                              This cover is fully hand-painted using the blue and white underglaze technology. It is an essential item for many people when brewing tea. It is used to hold teapot lids, Gaiwan lids, and cup lids. It not only keeps the lids of the tea ware clean but also prevents them from wetting the tabletop.

                                              In ancient Chinese culture, the sunflower is regarded as a symbol of auspiciousness and happiness due to its radiating appearance and vibrant, bright colors. It represents a future filled with vitality, brightness, and hope.

                                              In this lid saucer, the delicate brushstrokes vividly outline the flowers, creating a glossy and elegant appearance. The colours are rich and vibrant, giving the piece a sense of vivid and liveliness.

                                              Note: All are fully handmade, every lid saucer could be slightly different.

                                            • Handmade Green Wood Fired Kiln Altered Flower Tea CupHandmade Green Wood Fired Kiln Altered Flower Tea Cup
                                              $33.99

                                              The teacup is handmade using the wood-fired kiln-altered glaze technique, and its glaze presents a unique green colour. The phenomenon of crystal formation is caused by a kiln altered in a cup, commonly known as “crystal flowers”.

                                              The varying shades of colour make each cup one-of-a-kind, adding a rugged and beautiful charm to your tea table. Its design features a high foot and a small base, which give it a delicate appearance. The mouth of the cup is designed with a flower shape, making the whole cup look even more entertaining.

                                              Attention:

                                              • Kiln-fired glaze variations are often unpredictable and can result in a wide range of colours from a single firing.
                                              • The porosity of ceramics varies depending on the materials used, the recipe, the pressure applied, the duration of pressure, the thickness of the body, the firing temperature, and the duration of firing. Generally, the finer the porcelain, the smaller the pores, while the coarser the pottery, the larger the pores.
                                              • Since porcelain is made from clay, the amount of iron spots present in the clay varies depending on the mineral content of the soil. These iron spots are harmless and do not affect the use of the porcelain. Removing them would require the use of chemical materials, which can be damaging to high-quality porcelain.
                                              • Handmade products are not perfect, and each piece can have differences in size, shape, colour, and other aspects.
                                            • Handmade Heart-shaped Kiln Altered Blue Tea CupHandmade Heart-shaped Kiln Altered Blue Tea Cup Out of Stock
                                              $29.99

                                              This handmade celadon chicken heart cup features a beautiful blue glaze that is created through the kiln altered baking process. During this process, the temperature and atmosphere inside the kiln are carefully controlled to produce variations in colour and texture on the surface of the pottery.

                                              The resulting blue glaze on this cup is a stunning example of the unique and unpredictable effects that can be achieved through this ancient technique. The subtle variations in shade and texture give the cup a natural and organic feel, and the delicate chicken heart shape adds a touch of whimsy and charm.

                                              Crafted with meticulous attention to detail, this cup is entirely handmade and one-of-a-kind. Its smooth, rounded shape feels comfortable in the hand, and the rich, blue glaze adds depth and dimension to the surface.

                                              Attention:

                                              • Kiln-fired glaze variations are often unpredictable and can result in a wide range of colours from a single firing.
                                              • The porosity of ceramics varies depending on the materials used, the recipe, the pressure applied, the duration of pressure, the thickness of the body, the firing temperature, and the duration of firing. Generally, the finer the porcelain, the smaller the pores, while the coarser the pottery, the larger the pores.
                                              • Since porcelain is made from clay, the amount of iron spots present in the clay varies depending on the mineral content of the soil. These iron spots are harmless and do not affect the use of the porcelain. Removing them would require the use of chemical materials, which can be damaging to high-quality porcelain.
                                              • Handmade products are not perfect, and each piece can have differences in size, shape, colour, and other aspects.
                                            • Handmade Wood Fired Kiln Altered Red Tea CupHandmade Wood Fired Kiln Altered Red Tea Cup Out of Stock
                                              $33.99

                                              This red teacup is baked with firewood and is made of both kiln-fired glaze variations and cracked glaze craft. Because kiln alteration techniques enable an exciting and dynamic way to create different red colour glazes on this teacup, each teacup is unique and made by hand, with no two being exactly alike. The phenomenon of crystal formation is caused by kiln altered in a cup, commonly known as “crystal flowers”.

                                              Besides that, the unique cracked glaze technique used creates beautiful patterns on the cup’s surface. Over time as it is soaked with tea soup, and then resulting variations in the pattern make each piece truly outstanding and add more enjoyment to the tea drinking experience.

                                              Attention:

                                              • Kiln-fired glaze variations are often unpredictable and can result in a wide range of colours from a single firing.
                                              • The porosity of ceramics varies depending on the materials used, the recipe, the pressure applied, the duration of pressure, the thickness of the body, the firing temperature, and the duration of firing. Generally, the finer the porcelain, the smaller the pores, while the coarser the pottery, the larger the pores.
                                              • Since porcelain is made from clay, the amount of iron spots present in the clay varies depending on the mineral content of the soil. These iron spots are harmless and do not affect the use of the porcelain. Removing them would require the use of chemical materials, which can be damaging to high-quality porcelain.
                                              • Handmade products are not perfect, and each piece can have differences in size, shape, colour, and other aspects.
                                            • Handmade Wood Fired Kiln Altered Snow Fair CupHandmade Wood Fired Kiln Altered Snow Fair Cup Out of Stock
                                              $44.99

                                              This fair cup was baked with firewood and was made of both kiln-fired glaze variations and coloured & cracked glaze craft. Each one is unique and handmade – no two being exactly alike.

                                              The overall design of this fair cup is simple and unsophisticated. The unique cracked glaze technique used creates beautiful patterns on the cup’s surface. Over time as it is soaked with tea soup, then resulting variations in the pattern make each piece truly outstanding and add more enjoyment to the tea-drinking experience.

                                              Attention:

                                              • Kiln-fired glaze variations are often unpredictable and can result in a wide range of colours from a single firing.
                                              • The porosity of ceramics varies depending on the materials used, the recipe, the pressure applied, the duration of pressure, the thickness of the body, the firing temperature, and the duration of firing. Generally, the finer the porcelain, the smaller the pores, while the coarser the pottery, the larger the pores.
                                              • Since porcelain is made from clay, the amount of iron spots present in the clay varies depending on the mineral content of the soil. These iron spots are harmless and do not affect the use of the porcelain. Removing them would require the use of chemical materials, which can be damaging to high-quality porcelain.
                                              • Handmade products are not perfect, and each piece can have differences in size, shape, colour, and other aspects.
                                            • Handmade Wood-Fired Crackle Glaze Square Fair CupHandmade Wood-Fired Crackle Glaze Square Fair Cup
                                              $68.99

                                              This fair cup is baked with firewood and is made by both kiln-fired glaze variations and cracked glaze craft. Each one is unique and made by hand, with no two being exactly alike.

                                              The square and simple shape of the cup allows for smooth pouring. The unique cracked glaze technique used creates beautiful patterns on the cup’s surface. Over time as it is soaked with tea soup, resulting variations in the pattern make each piece truly outstanding and add more enjoyment to the tea-drinking experience.

                                              Attention:

                                              • Kiln-fired glaze variations are often unpredictable and can result in a wide range of colours from a single firing.
                                              • The porosity of ceramics varies depending on the materials used, the recipe, the pressure applied, the duration of pressure, the thickness of the body, the firing temperature, and the duration of firing. Generally, the finer the porcelain, the smaller the pores, while the coarser the pottery, the larger the pores.
                                              • Since porcelain is made from clay, the amount of iron spots present in the clay varies depending on the mineral content of the soil. These iron spots are harmless and do not affect the use of the porcelain. Removing them would require the use of chemical materials, which can be damaging to high-quality porcelain.
                                              • Handmade products are not perfect, and each piece can have differences in size, shape, colour, and other aspects.
                                            • Handmade Yellow Wood Fired Kiln Altered Flower Tea CupHandmade Yellow Wood Fired Kiln Altered Flower Tea Cup
                                              $33.99

                                              The teacup is handmade using the wood-fired kiln altered glaze technique, and its glaze presents a unique yellow and light purple colour. The phenomenon of crystal formation is caused by kiln altered in a cup, commonly known as “crystal flowers”.

                                              The varying shades of colour make each cup one-of-a-kind, adding a rugged and beautiful charm to your tea table. The mouth of the cup is designed with a flower shape, making the whole cup look even more entertaining.

                                              Attention:

                                              • Kiln-fired glaze variations are often unpredictable and can result in a wide range of colours from a single firing.
                                              • The porosity of ceramics varies depending on the materials used, the recipe, the pressure applied, the duration of pressure, the thickness of the body, the firing temperature, and the duration of firing. Generally, the finer the porcelain, the smaller the pores, while the coarser the pottery, the larger the pores.
                                              • Since porcelain is made from clay, the amount of iron spots present in the clay varies depending on the mineral content of the soil. These iron spots are harmless and do not affect the use of the porcelain. Removing them would require the use of chemical materials, which can be damaging to high-quality porcelain.
                                              • Handmade products are not perfect, and each piece can have differences in size, shape, colour, and other aspects.
                                            • Hand Painted Chanzhi Lian Lid SaucerHand Painted Chanzhi Lian Lid Saucer Out of Stock
                                              $75.99

                                              This cover is fully hand-painted using the blue and white underglaze technology. It is an essential item for many people when brewing tea. It is used to hold teapot lids, Gaiwan lids, and cup lids. It not only keeps the lids of the teaware clean but also prevents them from wetting the tabletop.

                                              Chanzhi Lian, also known as “Interlock Branch Lotus,” is a Chinese decorative motif with the symbolism of “flowers within flowers, blossoms within leaves.” It is also referred to as the “Wanshou Teng,” representing auspiciousness and longevity due to its continuous and interconnected structure, symbolizing the concept of “endless vitality.” In addition, in traditional Chinese Confucian culture, the lotus is seen as the embodiment of truth, goodness, and beauty, as well as a symbol of Buddhism. The pronunciation of “Lian” is similar to the word “continuous” in Chinese, further expressing the idea of continuous growth and conveying positive wishes and emotions.

                                              As part of Chinese traditional ornamentation, Chanzhi Lian has been passed down through generations, reflecting its own beauty and cultural significance with a unique artistic charm. The lotus possesses a sacred and pure temperament, being beautiful without being ostentatious and magnificent without being vulgar. It is precisely because of this aesthetic appeal that Chanzhi Lian has become a decorative pattern applied to various aspects of life.

                                              In this lid saucer, the delicate brushstrokes vividly outline the pattern, creating a glossy and elegant appearance. The colours are rich and vibrant, giving the piece a sense of vivid and liveliness.

                                              Note: All are fully handmade, every lid saucer can be slightly different.

                                            • Hand Painted Chanzhi Lian Flat Bottom GaiwanHand Painted Chanzhi Lian Flat Bottom Gaiwan
                                              $769.99

                                              The style of this super beautiful Gaiwan is Ming, using the underglaze blue technique, and entirely handcrafted and hand painted. The pattern features the classic design of intertwining lotus branches (Chanzhi Lian).

                                              Chanzhi Lian, also known as ‘intertwining lotus branches’ or ‘Interlock Branch Lotus’, is a Chinese decorative motif with the symbolism of “flowers within flowers, blossoms within leaves.” It is also referred to as the “Wanshou Teng,” representing auspiciousness and longevity due to its continuous and interconnected structure, symbolizing the concept of “endless vitality.” In addition, in traditional Chinese Confucian culture, the lotus is seen as the embodiment of truth, goodness, and beauty, as well as a symbol of Buddhism. The pronunciation of “Lian” is similar to the word “continuous” in Chinese, further expressing the idea of continuous growth and conveying positive wishes and emotions.

                                              As part of Chinese traditional ornamentation, Chanzhi Lian has been passed down through generations, reflecting its own beauty and cultural significance with a unique artistic charm. The lotus possesses a sacred and pure temperament, being beautiful without being ostentatious and magnificent without being vulgar. It is precisely because of this aesthetic appeal that Chanzhi Lian has become a decorative pattern applied to various aspects of life.

                                              The Ruyi motifs on the outside of this flat-bottom Gaiwan also carry auspicious meanings. The Ruyi symbolizes auspiciousness and good fortune. Its rounded and flawless form embodies blessings, satisfaction, and wishes fulfilled. Underneath its graceful appearance, it holds profound significance, representing the auspicious and delightful ideals of good fortune and contentment.

                                              In addition, the beautiful tin spots on the porcelain add even more unique charm to it. The formation of tin spots is due to the high content of iron elements in local parts of the blue pigment. After reaching saturation in the high-temperature glaze solution and cooling down, the iron elements in the supersaturated part start to precipitate. If the iron content of the blue pigment is higher and the cooling rate is appropriate, tin spots are more likely to appear on the surface of the ware.

                                              In addition to firing and materials, the formation of tin spots also involves the factor of glaze material. During the painting process, tin spots can also be formed due to the accumulation of blue pigment. Tin spots are more likely to appear on the surface of the ware at the intersections and the starting and ending points of brushstrokes. The formation of tin spots can be said to be a natural creation or an artificial decoration. This tin glazes not only add a rustic texture to the Gaiwan but also imbue it with a unique sense of history.

                                              The delicate brushstrokes and intricate detailing of the painting on this Gaiwan create a distinct sense of aesthetic appeal. The stunning underglaze blue, along with the heavy tin glaze, gives it a bold and intense beauty. This Gaiwan exudes a simple yet luxuriant charm, reminiscent of the style of imitation Ming, making it truly captivating and irresistible.

                                            • Hand Painted Antique Clay Glaze Bamboo GaiwanHand Painted Antique Clay Glaze Bamboo Gaiwan
                                              $113.99

                                              This Gaiwan is made with antique clay glaze, which gives it a smooth and lustrous surface, as well as a thick and sturdy body, evoking a sense of ancient elegance, tranquillity, and warmth. The hand-painted strokes are lively and natural, depicting the bamboo forest and rocks with lifelike accuracy.

                                              The Chinese bamboo forest and rocks have profound symbolic meanings in culture and art. The bamboo forest symbolizes resilience and humility. Bamboo is known for its strong vitality and flexible nature, able to withstand harsh winters and remain upright. This characteristic has made bamboo a symbol of traditional virtues in China, including perseverance, resilience in adversity, and modesty. Additionally, the bamboo forest is often seen as a place of seclusion, representing the pursuit of inner freedom and tranquillity. Rocks, on the other hand, symbolize stability and steadfastness. In Chinese art, rocks are frequently depicted as rugged, majestic, and serene. They represent the eternal and unchanging aspects of the natural world, as well as the values of determination and stability that people strive for in life. Rocks are also seen as symbols of wisdom and longevity, standing tall and unwavering despite the passage of time.

                                              Furthermore, the Gaiwan is crafted using the overglaze colour painting craft, which produces pure, vibrant, and full colours. Since Gaiwan is hand-painted by an artist, every piece is unique and machine-printed decals cannot be compared with.

                                            • Hand Painted Antique Clay Glaze Bamboo Tea TrayHand Painted Antique Clay Glaze Bamboo Tea Tray
                                              $99.99

                                              This tea tray is made with antique clay glaze, which gives it a smooth and lustrous surface, as well as a thick and sturdy body, evoking a sense of ancient elegance, tranquillity, and warmth. The hand-painted strokes are lively and natural, depicting the bamboo forest and rocks with lifelike accuracy.

                                              The Chinese bamboo forest and rocks have profound symbolic meanings in culture and art. The bamboo forest symbolizes resilience and humility. Bamboo is known for its strong vitality and flexible nature, able to withstand harsh winters and remain upright. This characteristic has made bamboo a symbol of traditional virtues in China, including perseverance, resilience in adversity, and modesty. Additionally, the bamboo forest is often seen as a place of seclusion, representing the pursuit of inner freedom and tranquillity. Rocks, on the other hand, symbolize stability and steadfastness. In Chinese art, rocks are frequently depicted as rugged, majestic, and serene. They represent the eternal and unchanging aspects of the natural world, as well as the values of determination and stability that people strive for in life. Rocks are also seen as symbols of wisdom and longevity, standing tall and unwavering despite the passage of time.

                                              Furthermore, the tea tray is crafted using the overglaze colour painting craft, which produces pure, vibrant, and full colours. Since tea tray is hand-painted by an artist, every piece is unique and machine-printed decals cannot compare with.

                                            • Hand Painted Antique Clay Glaze Goji GaiwanHand Painted Antique Clay Glaze Goji Gaiwan
                                              $109.99

                                              This Gaiwan is made with antique clay glaze, which gives it a smooth and lustrous surface, as well as a thick and sturdy body, evoking a sense of ancient elegance, tranquillity, and warmth. The hand-painted pictures are lively and natural, depicting the goji berries with lifelike accuracy.

                                              Goji berries, a small orange-red fruit with a long history in China, symbolize auspiciousness and happiness. The elongated fruits of goji berries are fiery red in color, hence in China, goji berries are regarded as a symbol of celebration and joy. The fiery red goji berries represent good luck and signify a life filled with prosperity and vitality.

                                              Furthermore, the Gaiwan is crafted using the overglaze colour painting craft, which produces pure, vibrant, and full colours. Since Gaiwan is hand-painted by an artist, every piece is unique and machine-printed decals cannot compare with.

                                            • Hand Painted Antique Clay Glaze San Duo Tea TrayHand Painted Antique Clay Glaze San Duo Tea Tray
                                              $99.99

                                              This tea tray is made with imitation antique clay glaze, with a smooth and glossy glaze surface and a thick and solid body, giving it a sense of antique elegance, tranquillity, and warmth. The hand-painted picture is vivid and natural, depicting lifelike pomegranates.

                                              ‘San Duo’ is a traditional auspicious pattern in China, originating from the phrase “Hua Feng San Zhu Duo Fu, Duo Shou, Duo Zi,” which means “abundant blessings, longevity, and many children.” Traditional patterns often consist of Buddha’s hand citron, peaches, and pomegranates. This pattern features pomegranates. In ancient China, pomegranates symbolized a prosperous and auspicious life with abundance, good fortune, and prosperity. The pomegranate is red both inside and outside, symbolizing a vibrant life and passionate individuals. As the pomegranate has numerous seeds, people use it as a symbol of wishing for a large and prosperous family, and the ancients referred to it as ‘a thousand chambers with the same membrane, a thousand children as one’.

                                              This tea tray is made using the overglaze technique, with vibrant and full colours in the painted design. Each lid bowl is individually hand-painted by skilled artists, making each one unique and machine-printed decals cannot compare with.

                                            • Hand Painted Bao Xiang Gaiwan Set - LotusHand Painted Bao Xiang Gaiwan Set - Lotus
                                              $195.99

                                              This tea tray is completely handmade and hand-painted. The pattern featured is called “Bao Xiang” in Chinese, which is a traditional decorative motif representing one of the auspicious three treasures (Bao Xiang flower, Money tree, and Treasure basin), prevalent during the Sui and Tang dynasties in China. Bao Xiang pattern is also known as ‘Bao Xian Hua’ or ‘Bao Lian Hua’. Its lines are clear, and the colour is serene and antique. The Bao Xiang pattern design of this teaware is neat, and complex but not messy, and the whole picture of it is full and rich in details.

                                              In Chinese culture, the Bao Xiang pattern symbolizes auspiciousness and happiness, representing people’s aspirations for happiness. It is widely popular in the decoration of silk brocade, bronze mirrors, and porcelain, showcasing people’s pursuit of a better life.

                                              This tea tray features smooth and concise curves, combining the unique beauty of the Bao Xiang pattern, creating a visually appealing and enjoyable tea-drinking experience.

                                            • Hand Painted Bao Xiang Gaiwan SetHand Painted Bao Xiang Gaiwan Set
                                              $199.99

                                              This Gaiwan is completely handmade and hand-painted. The pattern featured is called “Bao Xiang” in Chinese, which is a traditional decorative motif representing one of the auspicious three treasures (Bao Xiang flower, Money tree, and Treasure basin), prevalent during the Sui and Tang dynasties in China. Bao Xiang pattern is also known as ‘Bao Xian Hua’ or ‘Bao Lian Hua’. Its lines are clear, and the colour is serene and antique. The Bao Xiang pattern design of this teaware is neat, and complex but not messy, and the whole picture of it is full and rich in details.

                                              In Chinese culture, the Bao Xiang pattern symbolizes auspiciousness and happiness, representing people’s aspirations for happiness. It is widely popular in the decoration of silk brocade, bronze mirrors, and porcelain, showcasing people’s pursuit of a better life.

                                              This Gaiwan features smooth and concise curves, combining the unique beauty of the Bao Xiang pattern, creating a visually appealing and enjoyable tea-drinking experience.

                                            • Hand Painted Bao Xiang Gaiwan Set - LotusHand Painted Bao Xiang Gaiwan Set - Lotus
                                              $259.99

                                              This Gaiwan is completely handmade and hand-painted. The pattern featured is called “Bao Xiang” in Chinese, which is a traditional decorative motif representing one of the auspicious three treasures (Bao Xiang flower, Money tree, and Treasure basin), prevalent during the Sui and Tang dynasties in China. Bao Xiang pattern is also known as ‘Bao Xian Hua’ or ‘Bao Lian Hua’. Its lines are clear, and the colour is serene and antique. The Bao Xiang pattern design of this teaware is neat, and complex but not messy, and the whole picture of it is full and rich in details.

                                              In Chinese culture, the Bao Xiang pattern symbolizes auspiciousness and happiness, representing people’s aspirations for happiness. It is widely popular in the decoration of silk brocade, bronze mirrors, and porcelain, showcasing people’s pursuit of a better life.

                                              This Gaiwan features smooth and concise curves, combining the unique beauty of the Bao Xiang pattern, creating a visually appealing and enjoyable tea-drinking experience.

                                            • Hand Painted Bao Xiang Gaiwan SetHand Painted Bao Xiang Gaiwan Set
                                              From: $389.98

                                              This tea set is completely handmade and hand-painted. The pattern featured is called “Bao Xiang” in Chinese, which is a traditional decorative motif representing one of the auspicious three treasures (Bao Xiang flower, Money tree, and Treasure basin), prevalent during the Sui and Tang dynasties in China. Bao Xiang pattern is also known as ‘Bao Xian Hua’ or ‘Bao Lian Hua’. Its lines are clear, and the colour is serene and antique. The Bao Xiang pattern design of this teaware is neat, and complex but not messy, and the whole picture of it is full and rich in details.

                                              In Chinese culture, the Bao Xiang pattern symbolizes auspiciousness and happiness, representing people’s aspirations for happiness. It is widely popular in the decoration of silk brocade, bronze mirrors, and porcelain, showcasing people’s pursuit of a better life.

                                              This tea set features smooth and concise curves, combining the unique beauty of the Bao Xiang pattern, creating a visually appealing and enjoyable tea-drinking experience.

                                              This tea set includes:

                                            • Hand Painted Bao Xiang Gaiwan Set - LotusHand Painted Bao Xiang Gaiwan Set - Lotus
                                              From: $455.98

                                              This tea set is completely handmade and hand-painted. The pattern featured is called “Bao Xiang” in Chinese, which is a traditional decorative motif representing one of the auspicious three treasures (Bao Xiang flower, Money tree, and Treasure basin), prevalent during the Sui and Tang dynasties in China. Bao Xiang pattern is also known as ‘Bao Xian Hua’ or ‘Bao Lian Hua’. Its lines are clear, and the colour is serene and antique. The Bao Xiang pattern design of this teaware is neat, and complex but not messy, and the whole picture of it is full and rich in details.

                                              In Chinese culture, the Bao Xiang pattern symbolizes auspiciousness and happiness, representing people’s aspirations for happiness. It is widely popular in the decoration of silk brocade, bronze mirrors, and porcelain, showcasing people’s pursuit of a better life.

                                              This tea set features smooth and concise curves, combining the unique beauty of the Bao Xiang pattern, creating a visually appealing and enjoyable tea-drinking experience.

                                              This tea set includes:

                                            • Hand Painted Bao Xiang Pu-erh Tea CupHand Painted Bao Xiang Pu-erh Tea Cup Out of Stock
                                              $169.99

                                              This Baoxiang teacup is completely handmade and hand painted. The special craft used in this teaware includes Blue and white underglaze colour and underglaze red.

                                              The pattern featured is called “Bao Xiang” in Chinese, which is a traditional decorative motif representing one of the auspicious three treasures (Bao Xiang flower, Money tree, and Treasure basin), prevalent during the Sui and Tang dynasties in China. Bao Xiang pattern is also known as ‘Bao Xian Hua’ or ‘Bao Lian Hua’. Its lines are clear, and the colour is serene and antique. The Bao Xiang pattern design of this teaware is neat, and complex but not messy, and the whole picture of it is full and rich in details.

                                              In Chinese culture, the Bao Xiang pattern symbolizes auspiciousness and happiness, representing people’s aspirations for happiness. It is widely popular in the decoration of silk brocade, bronze mirrors, and porcelain, showcasing people’s pursuit of a better life.

                                              This teacup features smooth and concise curves, combining the unique beauty of the Bao Xiang pattern, creating a visually appealing and enjoyable tea-drinking experience.

                                            • Hand Painted Bao Xiang Gaiwan SetHand Painted Bao Xiang Gaiwan Set
                                              $189.99

                                              This tea tray is completely handmade and hand-painted. The pattern featured is called “Bao Xiang” in Chinese, which is a traditional decorative motif representing one of the auspicious three treasures (Bao Xiang flower, Money tree, and Treasure basin), prevalent during the Sui and Tang dynasties in China. Bao Xiang pattern is also known as ‘Bao Xian Hua’ or ‘Bao Lian Hua’. Its lines are clear, and the colour is serene and antique. The Bao Xiang pattern design of this teaware is neat, and complex but not messy, and the whole picture of it is full and rich in details.

                                              In Chinese culture, the Bao Xiang pattern symbolizes auspiciousness and happiness, representing people’s aspirations for happiness. It is widely popular in the decoration of silk brocade, bronze mirrors, and porcelain, showcasing people’s pursuit of a better life.

                                              This tea tray features smooth and concise curves, combining the unique beauty of the Bao Xiang pattern, creating a visually appealing and enjoyable tea-drinking experience.

                                            • Hand Painted YuanBao Shaped Bao Xiang Gaiwan SetHand Painted YuanBao Shaped Bao Xiang Gaiwan Set
                                              $229.99

                                              This tea tray is completely handmade and hand-painted. The special craft used in this teaware includes Blue and white underglaze colour and underglaze red.

                                              The pattern featured is called “Bao Xiang” in Chinese, which is a traditional decorative motif representing one of the auspicious three treasures (Bao Xiang flower, Money tree, and Treasure basin), prevalent during the Sui and Tang dynasties in China. Bao Xiang pattern is also known as ‘Bao Xian Hua’ or ‘Bao Lian Hua’. Its lines are clear, and the colour is serene and antique. The Bao Xiang pattern design of this teaware is neat, and complex but not messy, and the whole picture of it is full and rich in details.

                                              In Chinese culture, the Bao Xiang pattern symbolizes auspiciousness and happiness, representing people’s aspirations for happiness. It is widely popular in the decoration of silk brocade, bronze mirrors, and porcelain, showcasing people’s pursuit of a better life.

                                              This tea tray features smooth and concise curves, combining the unique beauty of the Bao Xiang pattern, creating a visually appealing and enjoyable tea-drinking experience. The blue and red underglaze colours complement each other and create a beautiful radiance.

                                            • Hand Painted Camellia Ruyi Pattern Tea TrayHand Painted Camellia Ruyi Pattern Tea Tray
                                              $519.99

                                              This tea tray is crafted with antique-style clay and meticulously made using underglaze blue techniques. Its delicate brushwork, subtle tin speckles, and warm, solid texture unique to antique-style clay imbue this tea tray with an aura of classical elegance and exquisite beauty.

                                              The decorative pattern on this tea tray features camellia flowers, adorned with Ruyi motifs on the sides. In ancient China, camellia flowers held rich symbolism and meaning. Firstly, camellia flowers symbolize resilience. As one of the few flowers that bloom in winter, camellias demonstrate remarkable endurance and can bloom independently even in the harsh cold. Therefore, camellias represent tenacity and the need for unwavering perseverance to achieve success. Secondly, camellias also symbolize love. With their vibrant colours and blossoms resembling smiling lips, camellias are not only beautiful but also convey passion. They are often used to express love, symbolizing the warmth and beauty of romantic affection. Lastly, camellias signify purity. Their simple coloration, free from the complexity and flamboyance of other flowers, makes them a symbol of purity and freshness, representing a pure and innocent heart.

                                              The Ruyi motifs on the sides of this tea tray also carry auspicious meanings. The Ruyi symbolizes auspiciousness and good fortune. Its rounded and flawless form embodies blessings, satisfaction, and wishes fulfilled. Underneath its graceful appearance, it holds profound significance, representing the auspicious and delightful ideals of good fortune and contentment.

                                              Expect those two traditional patterns, the beautiful tin speckles on the porcelain further enhance its unique charm. The formation of tin spots on Yuan blue and white is due to the high content of iron elements in local parts of the blue pigment. After reaching saturation in the high-temperature glaze solution and cooling down, the iron elements in the supersaturated part start to precipitate. If the iron content of the blue pigment is higher and the cooling rate is appropriate, tin spots are more likely to appear on the surface of the ware.

                                              In addition to firing and materials, the formation of tin spots also involves the factor of glaze material. During the painting process, tin spots can also be formed due to the accumulation of blue pigment. Tin spots are more likely to appear on the surface of the ware at the intersections and the starting and ending points of brushstrokes. The formation of tin spots can be said to be a natural creation or an artificial decoration.

                                              The body of this tea tray has a smooth and lustrous texture, with underglaze blue patterns that appear vivid and lifelike. The subtle tin speckles add a touch of nostalgia and natural beauty, exuding an old-world charm. Every brushstroke of the underglaze blue design is enchanting and vibrant. This beautiful blue-and-white tea tray not only embellishes your tea setting but also embodies the continuation of ancient culture and the expression of aesthetics. It allows you to immerse yourself in a graceful artistic atmosphere while enjoying your tea.

                                            • Hand painted Chanzhi Lian GaiwanHand painted Chanzhi Lian Gaiwan
                                              $899.99

                                              The style of this super beautiful Gaiwan is Ming, using the underglaze blue technique, and entirely handcrafted and hand painted. The pattern features the classic design of intertwining lotus branches (Chanzhi Lian).

                                              Chanzhi Lian, also known as ‘intertwining lotus branches’ or ‘Interlock Branch Lotus’, is a Chinese decorative motif with the symbolism of “flowers within flowers, blossoms within leaves.” It is also referred to as the “Wanshou Teng,” representing auspiciousness and longevity due to its continuous and interconnected structure, symbolizing the concept of “endless vitality.” In addition, in traditional Chinese Confucian culture, the lotus is seen as the embodiment of truth, goodness, and beauty, as well as a symbol of Buddhism. The pronunciation of “Lian” is similar to the word “continuous” in Chinese, further expressing the idea of continuous growth and conveying positive wishes and emotions.

                                              As part of Chinese traditional ornamentation, Chanzhi Lian has been passed down through generations, reflecting its own beauty and cultural significance with a unique artistic charm. The lotus possesses a sacred and pure temperament, being beautiful without being ostentatious and magnificent without being vulgar. It is precisely because of this aesthetic appeal that Chanzhi Lian has become a decorative pattern applied to various aspects of life.

                                              In addition, the beautiful tin spots on the porcelain add even more unique charm to it. The formation of tin spots is due to the high content of iron elements in local parts of the blue pigment. After reaching saturation in the high-temperature glaze solution and cooling down, the iron elements in the supersaturated part start to precipitate. If the iron content of the blue pigment is higher and the cooling rate is appropriate, tin spots are more likely to appear on the surface of the ware.

                                              In addition to firing and materials, the formation of tin spots also involves the factor of glaze material. During the painting process, tin spots can also be formed due to the accumulation of blue pigment. Tin spots are more likely to appear on the surface of the ware at the intersections and the starting and ending points of brushstrokes. The formation of tin spots can be said to be a natural creation or an artificial decoration. This tin glazes not only add a rustic texture to the Gaiwan but also imbue it with a unique sense of history.

                                              The delicate brushstrokes and intricate detailing of the painting on this Gaiwan create a distinct sense of aesthetic appeal. The soft and elegant shade of underglaze blue, along with a hint of faint tin glaze, gives it a graceful and ethereal beauty under the light. This Gaiwan exudes a simple yet elegant charm, reminiscent of the style of imitation Ming, making it truly captivating and irresistible.

                                            • Hand painted Chanzhi Lian Tea CupHand painted Chanzhi Lian Tea Cup
                                              $515.99

                                              The style of this super beautiful teacup is Ming, using the underglaze blue technique, and entirely handcrafted and hand painted. The pattern features the classic design of intertwining lotus branches (Chanzhi Lian).

                                              Chanzhi Lian, also known as ‘intertwining lotus branches’ or ‘Interlock Branch Lotus’, is a Chinese decorative motif with the symbolism of “flowers within flowers, blossoms within leaves.” It is also referred to as the “Wanshou Teng,” representing auspiciousness and longevity due to its continuous and interconnected structure, symbolizing the concept of “endless vitality.” In addition, in traditional Chinese Confucian culture, the lotus is seen as the embodiment of truth, goodness, and beauty, as well as a symbol of Buddhism. The pronunciation of “Lian” is similar to the word “continuous” in Chinese, further expressing the idea of continuous growth and conveying positive wishes and emotions.

                                              As part of Chinese traditional ornamentation, Chanzhi Lian has been passed down through generations, reflecting its own beauty and cultural significance with a unique artistic charm. The lotus possesses a sacred and pure temperament, being beautiful without being ostentatious and magnificent without being vulgar. It is precisely because of this aesthetic appeal that Chanzhi Lian has become a decorative pattern applied to various aspects of life.

                                              In addition, the beautiful tin spots on the porcelain add even more unique charm to it. The formation of tin spots is due to the high content of iron elements in local parts of the blue pigment. After reaching saturation in the high-temperature glaze solution and cooling down, the iron elements in the supersaturated part start to precipitate. If the iron content of the blue pigment is higher and the cooling rate is appropriate, tin spots are more likely to appear on the surface of the ware.

                                              In addition to firing and materials, the formation of tin spots also involves the factor of glaze material. During the painting process, tin spots can also be formed due to the accumulation of blue pigment. Tin spots are more likely to appear on the surface of the ware at the intersections and the starting and ending points of brushstrokes. The formation of tin spots can be said to be a natural creation or an artificial decoration. This tin glazes not only add a rustic texture to the teacup but also imbue it with a unique sense of history.

                                              The delicate brushstrokes and intricate detailing of the painting on this teacup create a distinct sense of aesthetic appeal. The soft and elegant shade of underglaze blue, along with a hint of faint tin glaze, gives it a graceful and ethereal beauty under the light. This teacup exudes a simple yet elegant charm, reminiscent of the style of imitation Ming, making it truly captivating and irresistible.

                                            • Hand Painted Chanzhi Lian Thin-walled Tea CupHand Painted Chanzhi Lian Thin-walled Tea Cup
                                              $559.99

                                              The style of this super beautiful teacup is Ming, using the underglaze blue technique, and entirely handcrafted and hand painted. The pattern features the classic design of intertwining lotus branches (Chanzhi Lian). What’s even more astonishing is the delicate craftsmanship of this teacup creates a thinness akin to cicada wings, a brilliance reminiscent of glass, and a weightless feel as floating clouds. When held up to the light, the intricately drawn interlocking lotus pattern inside the cup faintly emerges, elusive yet enchanting. It’s as if colorful clouds chase the moon, casting a misty glow, a sight so beautiful it’s beyond words, captivating, and mesmerizing.

                                              The pattern of this beautiful teacup is Chanzhi Lian, which is also known as ‘intertwining lotus branches’ or ‘Interlock Branch Lotus’, which is a Chinese decorative motif with the symbolism of “flowers within flowers, blossoms within leaves.” It is also referred to as the “Wanshou Teng,” representing auspiciousness and longevity due to its continuous and interconnected structure, symbolizing the concept of “endless vitality.” In addition, in traditional Chinese Confucian culture, the lotus is seen as the embodiment of truth, goodness, and beauty, as well as a symbol of Buddhism. The pronunciation of “Lian” is similar to the word “continuous” in Chinese, further expressing the idea of continuous growth and conveying positive wishes and emotions.

                                              As part of Chinese traditional ornamentation, Chanzhi Lian has been passed down through generations, reflecting its own beauty and cultural significance with a unique artistic charm. The lotus possesses a sacred and pure temperament, being beautiful without being ostentatious and magnificent without being vulgar. It is precisely because of this aesthetic appeal that Chanzhi Lian has become a decorative pattern applied to various aspects of life.

                                              The Ruyi motifs on the outside of this teacup also carry auspicious meanings. The Ruyi symbolizes auspiciousness and good fortune. Its rounded and flawless form embodies blessings, satisfaction, and wishes fulfilled. Underneath its graceful appearance, it holds profound significance, representing the auspicious and delightful ideals of good fortune and contentment.

                                              In addition, the beautiful tin spots on the porcelain add even more unique charm to it. The formation of tin spots is due to the high content of iron elements in local parts of the blue pigment. After reaching saturation in the high-temperature glaze solution and cooling down, the iron elements in the supersaturated part start to precipitate. If the iron content of the blue pigment is higher and the cooling rate is appropriate, tin spots are more likely to appear on the surface of the ware.

                                              In addition to firing and materials, the formation of tin spots also involves the factor of glaze material. During the painting process, tin spots can also be formed due to the accumulation of blue pigment. Tin spots are more likely to appear on the surface of the ware at the intersections and the starting and ending points of brushstrokes. The formation of tin spots can be said to be a natural creation or an artificial decoration. These tin glazes not only add a rustic texture to the teacup but also imbue it with a unique sense of history.

                                              The delicate brushstrokes and intricate detailing of the painting on this teacup create a distinct sense of aesthetic appeal. The stunning underglaze blue, along with the heavy tin glaze, gives it a bold and intense beauty. The thin-walled body also adds another layer of beauty to it. This teacup exudes a simple yet luxuriant charm, reminiscent of the style of imitation Ming, making it truly captivating and irresistible.

                                            • Hand Painted Dou Cai Pi Qiu Hua GaiwanHand Painted Dou Cai Pi Qiu Hua Gaiwan
                                              $339.99

                                              This small and delicate Dou Cai Pi Qiu Hua Gaiwan is meticulously crafted with the technique of clashing colour.

                                              As we all know, Doucai is a precious art form in traditional Chinese porcelain craftsmanship. It originated and was fired during the Xuande period of the Ming Dynasty, and Dou Cai from the Chenghua period of the Ming Dynasty is highly esteemed. Dou Cai is a type of decoration that combines underglaze blue (qinghua) and overglaze colour painting.

                                              Dou Cai involves applying mineral pigments onto the previously fired underglaze blue porcelain, filling in the gaps left by the underglaze blue patterns and colouring the space within the outline of the underglaze blue design. The porcelain is then fired in a lower-temperature kiln (800°C). Dou Cai is renowned for its vibrant and varied colour palette, as well as its refined and sophisticated decorative style that reflects the aesthetic taste of the Ming Dynasty.

                                              The decorative pattern of Pi Qiu Hua (皮球花), also known as little tuan hua (小团花) or embroidery ball flower, evolved from the traditional tuan hua pattern on porcelain. This pattern has been present since the Sui Dynasty, and it combines abstract and representational elements. It takes various forms, resembling a spherical shape, hence the name Pi Qiu Hua (皮球花).

                                              The decorative patterns on Chinese porcelain always carry auspicious meanings. Since the Pi Qiu Hua pattern originated from tuan hua, it inherits the traditional tuan hua motifs such as tuan long (团龙), tuan feng (团凤), and tuan hua (团花). These traditional motifs symbolize the abundance and beauty of life.

                                              This beautiful Gaiwan, with its vibrant colours and exquisite craftsmanship, is an eye-catching presence wherever it is placed. Imagine having a cup of spring tea by using this charming Gaiwan, it could be the most delightful experience for a day!

                                            • Hand Painted Dou Cai Pi Qiu Hua GaiwanHand Painted Dou Cai Pi Qiu Hua Gaiwan
                                              From: $619.98

                                              This small and delicate Dou Cai Pi Qiu Hua teaware set is meticulously crafted with the technique of clashing colour.

                                              As we all know, Doucai is a precious art form in traditional Chinese porcelain craftsmanship. It originated and was fired during the Xuande period of the Ming Dynasty, and Dou Cai from the Chenghua period of the Ming Dynasty is highly esteemed. Dou Cai is a type of decoration that combines underglaze blue (qinghua) and overglaze colour painting.

                                              Dou Cai involves applying mineral pigments onto the previously fired underglaze blue porcelain, filling in the gaps left by the underglaze blue patterns and colouring the space within the outline of the underglaze blue design. The porcelain is then fired in a lower-temperature kiln (800°C). Dou Cai is renowned for its vibrant and varied colour palette, as well as its refined and sophisticated decorative style that reflects the aesthetic taste of the Ming Dynasty.

                                              The decorative pattern of Pi Qiu Hua (皮球花), also known as little tuan hua (小团花) or embroidery ball flower, evolved from the traditional tuan hua pattern on porcelain. This pattern has been present since the Sui Dynasty, and it combines abstract and representational elements. It takes various forms, resembling a spherical shape, hence the name Pi Qiu Hua (皮球花).

                                              The decorative patterns on Chinese porcelain always carry auspicious meanings. Since the Pi Qiu Hua pattern originated from tuan hua, it inherits the traditional tuan hua motifs such as tuan long (团龙), tuan feng (团凤), and tuan hua (团花). These traditional motifs symbolize the abundance and beauty of life.

                                              This beautiful tea set, with its vibrant colours and exquisite craftsmanship, is an eye-catching presence wherever it is placed. Imagine having a cup of spring tea by using this charming tea set, it could be the most delightful experience for a day!

                                              This tea set includes:

                                            • Hand Painted Dou Cai Pi Qiu Hua Tea TrayHand Painted Dou Cai Pi Qiu Hua Gaiwan
                                              $279.99

                                              This small and delicate Dou Cai Pi Qiu Hua tea tray is meticulously crafted with the technique of clashing colour.

                                              As we all know, Doucai is a precious art form in traditional Chinese porcelain craftsmanship. It originated and was fired during the Xuande period of the Ming Dynasty, and Dou Cai from the Chenghua period of the Ming Dynasty is highly esteemed. Dou Cai is a type of decoration that combines underglaze blue (qinghua) and overglaze colour painting.

                                              Dou Cai involves applying mineral pigments onto the previously fired underglaze blue porcelain, filling in the gaps left by the underglaze blue patterns and colouring the space within the outline of the underglaze blue design. The porcelain is then fired in a lower-temperature kiln (800°C). Dou Cai is renowned for its vibrant and varied colour palette, as well as its refined and sophisticated decorative style that reflects the aesthetic taste of the Ming Dynasty.

                                              The decorative pattern of Pi Qiu Hua (皮球花), also known as little tuan hua (小团花) or embroidery ball flower, evolved from the traditional tuan hua pattern on porcelain. This pattern has been present since the Sui Dynasty, and it combines abstract and representational elements. It takes various forms, resembling a spherical shape, hence the name Pi Qiu Hua (皮球花).

                                              The decorative patterns on Chinese porcelain always carry auspicious meanings. Since the Pi Qiu Hua pattern originated from tuan hua, it inherits the traditional tuan hua motifs such as tuan long (团龙), tuan feng (团凤), and tuan hua (团花). These traditional motifs symbolize the abundance and beauty of life.

                                              This beautiful tea tray, with its vibrant colours and exquisite craftsmanship, is an eye-catching presence wherever it is placed. Imagine having a cup of spring tea by using this charming tea tray, it could be the most delightful experience for a day!

                                            • Hand Painted Enamel Butterfly Loves Flower GaiwanHand Painted Enamel Butterfly Loves Flower Gaiwan Out of Stock
                                              $999.99

                                              This Gaiwan is handcrafted using the technique of Blue-and-white underglaze colour and enamel glazed painting. The design features a pattern of butterflies amid flowers, displaying rich and lifelike colours, creating a unique and charming ambiance.

                                              Blue and White Enamel is a distinctive porcelain decoration technique that combines the traditional methods of blue and white with enamel. It is a variation of the traditional Chinese porcelain production, blending the characteristics of blue and white with enamel, resulting in a captivating and unique decorative style.

                                              Blue and White refers to the technique of painting blue patterns on the porcelain surface. It originated during the Yuan dynasty but reached its peak during the Ming and Qing dynasties. This decorative method uses cobalt oxide blue pigments that fuse with the porcelain surface at high temperatures, ensuring the patterns’ durability.

                                              Enamel, on the other hand, is a decorative technique that involves transplanting the cloisonné enamel method onto a porcelain body as an overglaze colour decoration. Enamel decoration on porcelain, known as “Fàlángcǎi” in Chinese, entails painting colourful patterns on the porcelain surface and then firing it at high temperatures to fuse the colours with the porcelain, achieving a durable and splendid design. These patterns often feature exquisite themes such as flowers, birds, figures, and landscapes, reflecting the essence of traditional Chinese culture and art.

                                              The process of creating enamel decorations is extremely intricate and complex, requiring skilled and experienced craftsmen. First, the porcelain prototype is made, and then special mineral pigments are used to paint patterns on its surface. Once the painting is completed, a series of firing processes follow, during which the temperature and timing for both the porcelain and the enamel colours are crucial factors. Improper temperature or timing can result in cracks in the porcelain or unstable colours. Enamel decoration is considered a treasure in traditional Chinese craftsmanship, representing the wisdom and skills of ancient Chinese artisans.

                                              The combination of blue and white enamel unites these two techniques, typically starting with the blue and white technique to depict blue patterns, and then applying enamel decoration to add additional colours and enhance the visual effect and three-dimensional sense of the design. This decorative method enriches the patterns on the porcelain while preserving the distinctive features of both blue and white and enamel techniques. During the Ming and Qing dynasties, blue and white enamel reached its peak and became one of the main styles for porcelain decoration at that time.

                                              The design of this Gaiwan showcases lifelike patterns of butterflies amid flowers. “Butterflies in Love with Flowers” symbolizes sweet love and blissful marriage. In recent times, people have endowed this motif with more profound meanings, expressing good wishes and symbolizing beautiful and prosperous love. Butterflies are often seen as symbols of happiness and love, inspiring and captivating people’s imagination, and aspirations. In traditional Chinese literature, a pair of flying butterflies represents the pursuit of free and passionate love. Butterflies are loyal to their mates, having only one partner throughout their lives, making them a symbol of fidelity in the insect world. Moreover, there is a beautiful Chinese folktale known as “The Butterfly Lovers,” which further enhances the symbolism of sweet love and harmonious marriage associated with the motif of butterflies and flowers.

                                              This enamel-decorated Gaiwan displays a rich and colourful palette, with lively and dynamic brushstrokes, immersing people in an elegant artistic ambiance while enjoying their tea.

                                            • Hand Painted Flowers Lid SaucerHand Painted Flowers Lid Saucer
                                              $229.99

                                              This cover is fully hand-painted using the blue and white underglaze technology. It is an essential item for many people when brewing tea. It is used to hold teapot lids, Gaiwan lids, and cup lids. It not only keeps the lids of the teaware clean but also prevents them from wetting the tabletop.

                                              The Wan-Hua design, also known as “myriad flowers,” “flowers on top of flowers,” or “adding flowers to enhance beauty,” is commonly depicted in the central area of the object. It often features large patterns of peonies, surrounded by various smaller floral patterns such as chrysanthemums, camellia, roses, lotuses, lilies, morning glories, and others. The intricate secondary patterns cover the entire surface, symbolizing the gathering of myriad flowers and representing prosperity and harmony.

                                              In this lid saucer, the delicate brushstrokes vividly outline the different flowers, creating a glossy and elegant appearance. The colours are rich and vibrant, giving the piece a sense of vivid and liveliness.

                                              Note: All are fully handmade, and every lid saucer can be slightly different.

                                            • Hand Painted Flowers Tea CupHand Painted Flowers Tea Cup
                                              $195.99

                                              This charming teacup is using blue and white porcelain craftsmanship, made entirely by hand.

                                              The beautiful picture on the body of the teacup is called ‘Wan Hua’, also known as “myriad flowers,” “flowers on top of flowers,” or “adding flowers to enhance beauty,” which is commonly depicted in the central area of the object. It often features large patterns of peonies, surrounded by various smaller floral patterns such as chrysanthemums, camellia, roses, lotuses, lilies, morning glories, and others. The intricate secondary patterns cover the entire surface, symbolizing the gathering of myriad flowers and representing prosperity and harmony.

                                              The delicate brushstrokes vividly outline the different flowers, creating a glossy and elegant appearance. The colours are rich and vibrant, giving the piece a sense of vivid and liveliness.

                                              Note: This tea cup is fully handmade, every teacup can be slightly different.

                                            • Hand Painted Enamel Butterfly Loves Flower GaiwanHand Painted Enamel Butterfly Loves Flower Gaiwan
                                              From: $2,168.98

                                              This tea set is handcrafted using the technique of Blue-and-white underglaze colour and enamel glazed painting. The design features a pattern of butterflies amid flowers, displaying rich and lifelike colours, creating a unique and charming ambiance.

                                              Blue and White Enamel is a distinctive porcelain decoration technique that combines the traditional methods of blue and white with enamel. It is a variation of the traditional Chinese porcelain production, blending the characteristics of blue and white with enamel, resulting in a captivating and unique decorative style.

                                              Blue and White refers to the technique of painting blue patterns on the porcelain surface. It originated during the Yuan dynasty but reached its peak during the Ming and Qing dynasties. This decorative method uses cobalt oxide blue pigments that fuse with the porcelain surface at high temperatures, ensuring the patterns’ durability.

                                              Enamel, on the other hand, is a decorative technique that involves transplanting the cloisonné enamel method onto a porcelain body as an overglaze colour decoration. Enamel decoration on porcelain, known as “Fàlángcǎi” in Chinese, entails painting colourful patterns on the porcelain surface and then firing it at high temperatures to fuse the colours with the porcelain, achieving a durable and splendid design. These patterns often feature exquisite themes such as flowers, birds, figures, and landscapes, reflecting the essence of traditional Chinese culture and art.

                                              The process of creating enamel decorations is extremely intricate and complex, requiring skilled and experienced craftsmen. First, the porcelain prototype is made, and then special mineral pigments are used to paint patterns on its surface. Once the painting is completed, a series of firing processes follow, during which the temperature and timing for both the porcelain and the enamel colours are crucial factors. Improper temperature or timing can result in cracks in the porcelain or unstable colours. Enamel decoration is considered a treasure in traditional Chinese craftsmanship, representing the wisdom and skills of ancient Chinese artisans.

                                              The combination of blue and white enamel unites these two techniques, typically starting with the blue and white technique to depict blue patterns, and then applying enamel decoration to add additional colours and enhance the visual effect and three-dimensional sense of the design. This decorative method enriches the patterns on the porcelain while preserving the distinctive features of both blue and white and enamel techniques. During the Ming and Qing dynasties, blue and white enamel reached its peak and became one of the main styles for porcelain decoration at that time.

                                              The design on this tea set showcases lifelike patterns of butterflies amid flowers. “Butterflies in Love with Flowers” symbolises sweet love and blissful marriage. In recent times, people have endowed this motif with more profound meanings, expressing good wishes and symbolizing beautiful and prosperous love. Butterflies are often seen as symbols of happiness and love, inspiring and captivating people’s imagination, and aspirations. In traditional Chinese literature, a pair of flying butterflies represents the pursuit of free and passionate love. Butterflies are loyal to their mates, having only one partner throughout their lives, making them a symbol of fidelity in the insect world. Moreover, there is a beautiful Chinese folktale known as “The Butterfly Lovers,” which further enhances the symbolism of sweet love and harmonious marriage associated with the motif of butterflies and flowers.

                                              This enamel-decorated tea set displays a rich and colourful palette, with lively and dynamic brushstrokes, immersing people in an elegant artistic ambiance while enjoying their tea.

                                              This tea set includes:

                                            • Hand Painted Golden Enamel Butterfly Loves Flower Tea Tray
                                              $1,168.99

                                              This tea tray is handcrafted using the technique of Blue-and-white underglaze colour and enamel glazed paint. The design features a pattern of butterflies amid flowers, displaying rich and lifelike colours, creating a unique and charming ambiance.

                                              Blue and White Enamel is a distinctive porcelain decoration technique that combines the traditional methods of blue and white with enamel. It is a variation of the traditional Chinese porcelain production, blending the characteristics of blue and white with enamel, resulting in a captivating and unique decorative style.

                                              Blue and White refers to the technique of painting blue patterns on the porcelain surface. It originated during the Yuan dynasty but reached its peak during the Ming and Qing dynasties. This decorative method uses cobalt oxide blue pigments that fuse with the porcelain surface at high temperatures, ensuring the patterns’ durability.

                                              Enamel, on the other hand, is a decorative technique that involves transplanting the cloisonné enamel method onto a porcelain body as an overglaze colour decoration. Enamel decoration on porcelain, known as “Fàlángcǎi” in Chinese, entails painting colourful patterns on the porcelain surface and then firing it at high temperatures to fuse the colours with the porcelain, achieving a durable and splendid design. These patterns often feature exquisite themes such as flowers, birds, figures, and landscapes, reflecting the essence of traditional Chinese culture and art.

                                              The process of creating enamel decorations is extremely intricate and complex, requiring skilled and experienced craftsmen. First, the porcelain prototype is made, and then special mineral pigments are used to paint patterns on its surface. Once the painting is completed, a series of firing processes follow, during which the temperature and timing for both the porcelain and the enamel colours are crucial factors. Improper temperature or timing can result in cracks in the porcelain or unstable colours. Enamel decoration is considered a treasure in traditional Chinese craftsmanship, representing the wisdom and skills of ancient Chinese artisans.

                                              The combination of blue and white enamel unites these two techniques, typically starting with the blue and white technique to depict blue patterns, and then applying enamel decoration to add additional colours and enhance the visual effect and three-dimensional sense of the design. This decorative method enriches the patterns on the porcelain while preserving the distinctive features of both blue and white and enamel techniques. During the Ming and Qing dynasties, blue and white enamel reached its peak and became one of the main styles for porcelain decoration at that time.

                                              The design on this tea tray showcases lifelike patterns of butterflies amid flowers. “Butterflies in Love with Flowers” symbolises sweet love and blissful marriage. In recent times, people have endowed this motif with more profound meanings, expressing good wishes and symbolizing beautiful and prosperous love. Butterflies are often seen as symbols of happiness and love, inspiring and captivating people’s imagination, and aspirations. In traditional Chinese literature, a pair of flying butterflies represents the pursuit of free and passionate love. Butterflies are loyal to their mates, having only one partner throughout their lives, making them a symbol of fidelity in the insect world. Moreover, there is a beautiful Chinese folktale known as “The Butterfly Lovers,” which further enhances the symbolism of sweet love and harmonious marriage associated with the motif of butterflies and flowers.

                                              This enamel-decorated tea tray displays a rich and colourful palette, with lively and dynamic brushstrokes, immersing people in an elegant artistic ambiance while enjoying their tea.

                                            • Hand Painted Heart Shaped Bao Xiang Tea CupHand Painted Heart Shaped Bao Xiang Tea Cup
                                              $189.99

                                              This heart shaped teacup is completely handmade, and hand painted. The special craft used in this teaware includes Blue and white underglaze colour and underglaze red.

                                              The pattern featured is called “Bao Xiang” in Chinese, which is a traditional decorative motif representing one of the auspicious three treasures (Bao Xiang flower, Money tree, and Treasure basin), prevalent during the Sui and Tang dynasties in China. Bao Xiang pattern is also known as ‘Bao Xian Hua’ or ‘Bao Lian Hua’. Its lines are clear, and the colour is serene and antique. The Bao Xiang pattern design of this teaware is neat, and complex but not messy, and the whole picture of it is full and rich in details.

                                              In Chinese culture, the Bao Xiang pattern symbolizes auspiciousness and happiness, representing people’s aspirations for happiness. It is widely popular in the decoration of silk brocade, bronze mirrors, and porcelain, showcasing people’s pursuit of a better life.

                                              This heart shaped teacup features smooth and concise curves, combining the unique beauty of Bao Xiang pattern, creating a visually appealing and enjoyable tea-drinking experience. The blue and red underglaze colours complement each other and create a beautiful radiance.

                                            • Hand Painted Horseshoe Shaped Bao Xiang Gaiwan SetHand Painted Horseshoe Shaped Bao Xiang Gaiwan Set Out of Stock
                                              $259.99

                                              This Gaiwan is completely handmade and hand-painted. The special craft used in this teaware includes Blue and white underglaze colour and underglaze red. The special horseshoe-shaped design allows for easy handling and prevents becoming too hot to touch.

                                              The pattern featured is called “Bao Xiang” in Chinese, which is a traditional decorative motif representing one of the auspicious three treasures (Bao Xiang flower, Money tree, and Treasure basin), prevalent during the Sui and Tang dynasties in China. Bao Xiang pattern is also known as ‘Bao Xian Hua’ or ‘Bao Lian Hua’. Its lines are clear, and the colour is serene and antique. The Bao Xiang pattern design of this teaware is neat, and complex but not messy, and the whole picture of it is full and rich in details.

                                              In Chinese culture, the Bao Xiang pattern symbolizes auspiciousness and happiness, representing people’s aspirations for happiness. It is widely popular in the decoration of silk brocade, bronze mirrors, and porcelain, showcasing people’s pursuit of a better life.

                                              This Gaiwan features smooth and concise curves, combining the unique beauty of the Bao Xiang pattern, creating a visually appealing and enjoyable tea-drinking experience. The blue and red underglaze colours complement each other and create a beautiful radiance.

                                            • Hand Painted Horseshoe Shaped Bao Xiang Gaiwan SetHand Painted Horseshoe Shaped Bao Xiang Gaiwan Set
                                              From: $455.98

                                              This tea set is completely handmade and hand-painted. The special craft used in this teaware includes Blue and white underglaze colour and underglaze red. The special horseshoe-shaped design allows for easy handling and prevents becoming too hot to touch.

                                              The pattern featured is called “Bao Xiang” in Chinese, which is a traditional decorative motif representing one of the auspicious three treasures (Bao Xiang flower, Money tree, and Treasure basin), prevalent during the Sui and Tang dynasties in China. Bao Xiang pattern is also known as ‘Bao Xian Hua’ or ‘Bao Lian Hua’. Its lines are clear, and the colour is serene and antique. The Bao Xiang pattern design of this teaware is neat, and complex but not messy, and the whole picture of it is full and rich in details.

                                              In Chinese culture, the Bao Xiang pattern symbolizes auspiciousness and happiness, representing people’s aspirations for happiness. It is widely popular in the decoration of silk brocade, bronze mirrors, and porcelain, showcasing people’s pursuit of a better life.

                                              This tea set includes:

                                            • Hand Painted Golden Enamel Butterfly Loves Flower Master Tea CupHand Painted Golden Enamel Butterfly Loves Flower Master Tea Cup
                                              $588.99

                                              This master cup is handcrafted using the technique of gold painting, Blue-and-white underglaze colour and enamel glazed and painted. The design features a pattern of butterflies amid flowers, displaying rich and lifelike colours, creating a unique and charming ambiance.

                                              Gold painting, one of the decorative techniques, involves applying gold powder (gold dust) or bright gold (gold solution) on the porcelain surface to create intricate patterns or to complement other decorations as borders or a golden background. Afterward, the cup is fired at a low temperature to achieve the final finish. Both the rim of this teacup’s mouth and bottom base employ the gold painting technique.

                                              Blue and White Enamel is a distinctive porcelain decoration technique that combines the traditional methods of blue and white with enamel. It is a variation of traditional Chinese porcelain production, blending the characteristics of blue and white with enamel, resulting in a captivating and unique decorative style.

                                              Blue and White refers to the technique of painting blue patterns on a porcelain surface. It originated during the Yuan dynasty but reached its peak during the Ming and Qing dynasties. This decorative method uses cobalt oxide blue pigments that fuse with the porcelain surface at high temperatures, ensuring the patterns’ durability.

                                              Enamel, on the other hand, is a decorative technique that involves transplanting the cloisonné enamel method onto a porcelain body as an overglaze colour decoration. Enamel decoration on porcelain, known as “Fàlángcǎi” in Chinese, entails painting colourful patterns on the porcelain surface and then firing it at high temperatures to fuse the colours with the porcelain, achieving a durable and splendid design. These patterns often feature exquisite themes such as flowers, birds, figures, and landscapes, reflecting the essence of traditional Chinese culture and art.

                                              The process of creating enamel decorations is extremely intricate and complex, requiring skilled and experienced craftsmen. First, the porcelain prototype is made, and then special mineral pigments are used to paint patterns on its surface. Once the painting is completed, a series of firing processes follow, during which the temperature and timing for both the porcelain and the enamel colours are crucial factors. Improper temperature or timing can result in cracks in the porcelain or unstable colours. Enamel decoration is considered a treasure in traditional Chinese craftsmanship, representing the wisdom and skills of ancient Chinese artisans.

                                              The combination of blue and white enamel unites these two techniques, typically starting with the blue and white technique to depict blue patterns, and then applying enamel decoration to add additional colours and enhance the visual effect and three-dimensional sense of the design. This decorative method enriches the patterns on the porcelain while preserving the distinctive features of both blue and white and enamel techniques. During the Ming and Qing dynasties, blue and white enamel reached its peak and became one of the main styles for porcelain decoration at that time.

                                               

                                              The design on this master teacup showcases lifelike patterns of butterflies amid flowers. “Butterflies in Love with Flowers” symbolize sweet love and blissful marriage. In recent times, people have endowed this motif with more profound meanings, expressing good wishes and symbolizing beautiful and prosperous love. Butterflies are often seen as symbols of happiness and love, inspiring and captivating people’s imagination, and aspirations. In traditional Chinese literature, a pair of flying butterflies represents the pursuit of free and passionate love. Butterflies are loyal to their mates, having only one partner throughout their lives, making them a symbol of fidelity in the insect world. Moreover, there is a beautiful Chinese folktale known as “The Butterfly Lovers,” which further enhances the symbolism of sweet love and harmonious marriage associated with the motif of butterflies and flowers.

                                              This enamel-decorated master cup displays a rich and colourful palette, with lively and dynamic brushstrokes, immersing people in an elegant artistic ambiance while enjoying their tea.

                                            • Hand Painted Juban Chicken Heart Tea CupHand Painted Juban Chicken Heart Tea Cup
                                              $645.99

                                              The style of this super beautiful teacup is Ming, using the underglaze blue technique, and entirely handcrafted and hand painted.

                                              This cup is adorned with blue and white patterns of wave and chrysanthemum petals on the outer wall. The interior of the cup is fully covered in blue and white patterns of Baoxiang flowers and Ruyi motifs, creating an overall design that is rich and detailed, with smooth and flowing lines. The blue and white colours are deep and elegant, with a white glaze featuring subtle flashes of blue. The glaze surface is glossy, and the texture is smooth. The cup has a lightweight and elegant shape, achieving a harmonious balance between practicality and aesthetics. At the bottom, there is a chicken-heart-shaped protrusion, hence the name ‘chicken-heart teacup’.

                                              In ancient China, waves naturally referred to the vast ocean, which symbolized gods and immortals and was believed to bestow numerous mystical benefits upon people, such as blessings and longevity. On the other hand, chrysanthemum petal motifs conveyed people’s heartfelt wishes for a blessed, long, and peaceful life.

                                              The Baoxiang flowers inside the cup symbolize good luck, harmony, happiness, and prosperity. The Ruyi motif’s auspiciousness, combining profound meaning with graceful form, represents the auspicious, favourable implications.

                                              In addition, the beautiful tin spots on the porcelain add even more unique charm to it. The formation of tin spots is due to the high content of iron elements in local parts of the blue pigment. After reaching saturation in the high-temperature glaze solution and cooling down, the iron elements in the supersaturated part start to precipitate. If the iron content of the blue pigment is higher and the cooling rate is appropriate, tin spots are more likely to appear on the surface of the ware.

                                              In addition to firing and materials, the formation of tin spots also involves the factor of glaze material. During the painting process, tin spots can also be formed due to the accumulation of blue pigment. Tin spots are more likely to appear on the surface of the ware at the intersections and the starting and ending points of brushstrokes. The formation of tin spots can be said to be a natural creation or an artificial decoration. This tin glazes not only add a rustic texture to the teacup but also imbue it with a unique sense of history.

                                              The body of this teacup is smooth and well-lubricated, while the underglaze blue patterns are vivid and lifelike. The faint tin specks add a touch of charm from a bygone era, evoking a sense of nostalgia and natural beauty, making it exquisitely graceful. Each stroke of the underglaze blue decoration is delicate and captivating, bringing the design to life. The intricate and refined patterns showcase the artist’s profound artistic skills.

                                            • Hand Painted Lang Hong Enamel Dunhuang Gaiwan - Er CaiHand Painted Lang Hong Enamel Dunhuang Gaiwan - Er Cai
                                              $849.99
                                              [vc_row et_row_padding="true" el_class="p-variations"][vc_column width="1/3" offset="vc_col-xs-4"][et_image alignment="aligncenter" image="30470" img_link="url:/p/hand-painted-lang-hong-enamel-dunhuang-gaiwan-san-cai/"][/et_image][/vc_column][vc_column width="1/3" offset="vc_col-xs-4"][et_image alignment="aligncenter" image="30531" extra_class="p-current"][/et_image][/vc_column][vc_column width="1/3" offset="vc_col-xs-4"][/vc_column][/vc_row]

                                              This Ercai Gaiwan is handcrafted using the technique of gold painting, Lang Hong colouring and enamel glazed paint. The pattern on its painting is Dunhuang-style, with vibrant and luxurious colours, exuding a sense of luxury and elegance.

                                              Gold painting, one of the decorative techniques, involves applying gold powder (gold dust) or bright gold (gold solution) on the porcelain surface to create intricate patterns or to complement other decorations such as borders or a golden background. Afterwards, the Gaiwan is fired at a low temperature to achieve the final finish. The lid, rim, and base of this Ercai Gaiwan are all embellished with intricate gold outlining craftsmanship.

                                              The patterns on this Gaiwan depict Dunhuang-style designs, layered and intricate, displaying a rich array of colours. Among them, the lotus pattern is the most used decorative motif in Dunhuang art. From the Northern Liang to the Yuan Dynasty, lotus flowers can be found in every cave of the Mogao Grottoes. In Buddhism, the lotus symbolizes purity and enlightenment. It is believed that one’s soul can attain rebirth through the lotus, leading to the blissful Western Pure Land. Within the Mogao Grottoes, lotus flowers adorn the background, embellishing figures of bodhisattvas and celestial beings, embodying the sacred and immaculate nature of Buddhas and bodhisattvas. Hence, the lotus is the quintessential flower representing Buddhism. Apart from the lotus, another significant motif is the honeysuckle, also known as Jin Hua (golden-silver flower).  It is an important decorative symbol in Dunhuang art, introduced alongside Buddhist art in China as a decorative floral theme.  The rise of honeysuckle patterns in China occurred nearly simultaneously with the spread of Buddhism.  Its extensive use in Buddhist decorations during the Northern Dynasties influenced secular ornamentation at that time.  Honeysuckle blooms during summer, transitioning from white to yellow after budding, shedding old leaves in late autumn, and promptly producing new leaves.  It endures even in the harshest winter conditions, quietly thriving in the wild with minimal requirements of water and soil.  As a result, the honeysuckle pattern found abundant application in Buddhist-related decorations, drawing from its persistent growth characteristics. Furthermore, the motif of the “Baoxiang Flower,” also known as Baoxianhua or Baolianhua, is another traditional auspicious pattern in Dunhuang decorations.  It is one of the auspicious Three Treasures and was prevalent during China’s Sui and Tang Dynasties.  The concept of “Baoxiang” originates from Buddhism, where it refers to a respectful term for Buddhist images.  The Baoxiang Flower represents an idealized form of purity, grace, and beauty.

                                              In addition to these captivating decorative patterns, the craftsmanship of Lang Hong ceramics is also deserving of praise. Firstly, the full name of Lang Hong is “Langyao Red,” also known as “Gem Red” or “Ox Blood Red.” It is one of the most vibrant colours in traditional Chinese precious copper red glazes. Lang Hong glaze is achieved by using copper as a colouring agent and firing it at a high temperature of 1300°C. Since copper elements easily evaporate at high temperatures, the range of colour expression is limited. The firing process demands strict control over the atmosphere and temperature, and the outcome is greatly affected by external factors, making it a highly challenging process to successfully produce Lang Hong ceramics. Lang Hong glaze boasts a smooth and translucent surface, resembling glass, with crackled patterns resembling cow hair texture.  The glaze exhibits a deep and vivid colour, resembling freshly congealed ox blood with its brilliant crimson hue, symbolizing auspiciousness, and wealth.  Revered as a “treasure among a thousand kilns,” the red-glazed porcelain of Lang Hong showcases a distinctive ethnic style, shining like a dazzling gem in the history of world ceramics.  The colour red, known for its auspiciousness and affluence, has elevated Lang Hong ceramics to a radiant and remarkable masterpiece in the realm of ceramic art.

                                              Enamel, on the other hand, is a decorative technique that involves transplanting the cloisonné enamel method onto a porcelain body as an overglaze colour decoration. Enamel decoration on porcelain, known as “Fàlángcǎi” in Chinese, entails painting colourful patterns on the porcelain surface and then firing it at high temperatures to fuse the colours with the porcelain, achieving a durable and splendid design. These patterns often feature exquisite themes such as flowers, birds, figures, and landscapes, reflecting the essence of traditional Chinese culture and art. The process of creating enamel decorations is extremely intricate and complex, requiring skilled and experienced craftsmen. First, the porcelain prototype is made, and then special mineral pigments are used to paint patterns on its surface. Once the painting is completed, a series of firing processes follow, during which the temperature and timing for both the porcelain and the enamel colours are crucial factors. Improper temperature or timing can result in cracks in the porcelain or unstable colours. Enamel decoration is considered a treasure in traditional Chinese craftsmanship, representing the wisdom and skills of ancient Chinese artisans.

                                              This Gaiwan showcases exquisite Lang Hong craftsmanship, with intricate and delicate Dunhuang patterns that carry profound symbolism.

                                            • Hand Painted Lang Hong Enamel Dunhuang Gaiwan - San CaiHand Painted Lang Hong Enamel Dunhuang Gaiwan - San Cai
                                              $999.99
                                              [vc_row et_row_padding="true" el_class="p-variations"][vc_column width="1/3" offset="vc_col-xs-4"][et_image alignment="aligncenter" image="30470" extra_class="p-current"][/et_image][/vc_column][vc_column width="1/3" offset="vc_col-xs-4"][et_image alignment="aligncenter" image="30531" img_link="url:/p/hand-painted-lang-hong-enamel-dunhuang-gaiwan-er-cai/"][/et_image][/vc_column][vc_column width="1/3" offset="vc_col-xs-4"][/vc_column][/vc_row]

                                              This Sancai Gaiwan is handcrafted using the technique of gold painting, Lang Hong colouring and enamel glazed paint. The pattern on its painting is Dunhuang-style, with vibrant and luxurious colours, exuding a sense of luxury and elegance.

                                              Gold painting, one of the decorative techniques, involves applying gold powder (gold dust) or bright gold (gold solution) on the porcelain surface to create intricate patterns or to complement other decorations as borders or a golden background. Afterwards, the Gaiwan is fired at a low temperature to achieve the final finish. The gold painting craftsmanship is applied in multiple areas of this Sancai Gaiwan.

                                              The patterns on this Gaiwan depict Dunhuang-style designs, layered and intricate, displaying a rich array of colours. Among them, the lotus pattern is the most used decorative motif in Dunhuang art. From the Northern Liang to the Yuan Dynasty, lotus flowers can be found in every cave of the Mogao Grottoes. In Buddhism, the lotus symbolizes purity and enlightenment. It is believed that one’s soul can attain rebirth through the lotus, leading to the blissful Western Pure Land. Within the Mogao Grottoes, lotus flowers adorn the background, embellishing figures of bodhisattvas and celestial beings, embodying the sacred and immaculate nature of Buddhas and bodhisattvas. Hence, the lotus is the quintessential flower representing Buddhism. Apart from the lotus, another significant motif is the honeysuckle, also known as Jin Hua (golden-silver flower).  It is an important decorative symbol in Dunhuang art, introduced alongside Buddhist art in China as a decorative floral theme.  The rise of honeysuckle patterns in China occurred nearly simultaneously with the spread of Buddhism.  Its extensive use in Buddhist decorations during the Northern Dynasties influenced secular ornamentation at that time.  Honeysuckle blooms during summer, transitioning from white to yellow after budding, shedding old leaves in late autumn, and promptly producing new leaves.  It endures even in the harshest winter conditions, quietly thriving in the wild with minimal requirements of water and soil.  As a result, the honeysuckle pattern found abundant application in Buddhist-related decorations, drawing from its persistent growth characteristics. Furthermore, the motif of the “Baoxiang Flower,” also known as Baoxianhua or Baolianhua, is another traditional auspicious pattern in Dunhuang decorations.  It is one of the auspicious Three Treasures and was prevalent during China’s Sui and Tang Dynasties.  The concept of “Baoxiang” originates from Buddhism, where it refers to a respectful term for Buddhist images.  The Baoxiang Flower represents an idealized form of purity, grace, and beauty.

                                              In addition to these captivating decorative patterns, the craftsmanship of Lang Hong ceramics is also deserving of praise. Firstly, the full name of Lang Hong is “Langyao Red,” also known as “Gem Red” or “Ox Blood Red.” It is one of the most vibrant colours in traditional Chinese precious copper red glazes. Lang Hong glaze is achieved by using copper as a colouring agent and firing it at a high temperature of 1300°C. Since copper elements easily evaporate at high temperatures, the range of colour expression is limited. The firing process demands strict control over the atmosphere and temperature, and the outcome is greatly affected by external factors, making it a highly challenging process to successfully produce Lang Hong ceramics. Lang Hong glaze boasts a smooth and translucent surface, resembling glass, with crackled patterns resembling cow hair texture.  The glaze exhibits a deep and vivid colour, resembling freshly congealed ox blood with its brilliant crimson hue, symbolizing auspiciousness, and wealth.  Revered as a “treasure among a thousand kilns,” the red-glazed porcelain of Lang Hong showcases a distinctive ethnic style, shining like a dazzling gem in the history of world ceramics.  The colour red, known for its auspiciousness and affluence, has elevated Lang Hong ceramics to a radiant and remarkable masterpiece in the realm of ceramic art.

                                              Enamel, on the other hand, is a decorative technique that involves transplanting the cloisonné enamel method onto a porcelain body as an overglaze colour decoration. Enamel decoration on porcelain, known as “Fàlángcǎi” in Chinese, entails painting colourful patterns on the porcelain surface and then firing it at high temperatures to fuse the colours with the porcelain, achieving a durable and splendid design. These patterns often feature exquisite themes such as flowers, birds, figures, and landscapes, reflecting the essence of traditional Chinese culture and art. The process of creating enamel decorations is extremely intricate and complex, requiring skilled and experienced craftsmen. First, the porcelain prototype is made, and then special mineral pigments are used to paint patterns on its surface. Once the painting is completed, a series of firing processes follow, during which the temperature and timing for both the porcelain and the enamel colours are crucial factors. Improper temperature or timing can result in cracks in the porcelain or unstable colours. Enamel decoration is considered a treasure in traditional Chinese craftsmanship, representing the wisdom and skills of ancient Chinese artisans.

                                              This Sancai Gaiwan showcases exquisite Lang Hong craftsmanship, with intricate and delicate Dunhuang patterns that carry profound symbolism.

                                            • Hand Painted Lang Hong Enamel Dunhuang Hat CupHand Painted Lang Hong Enamel Dunhuang Hat Cup
                                              $489.99

                                              This hat cup is handcrafted using the technique of gold painting, Lang Hong colouring and enamel glazed paint. The pattern on its painting is Dunhuang-style, with vibrant and luxurious colours, exuding a sense of luxury and elegance.

                                              Gold painting, one of the decorative techniques, involves applying gold powder (gold dust) or bright gold (gold solution) on the porcelain surface to create intricate patterns or to complement other decorations as borders or a golden background. Afterwards, the cup is fired at a low temperature to achieve the final finish. The rim of this teacup’s mouth employs the gold painting technique.

                                              The patterns on this cup depict Dunhuang-style designs, layered and intricate, displaying a rich array of colours. Among them, the lotus pattern is the most used decorative motif in Dunhuang art. From the Northern Liang to the Yuan Dynasty, lotus flowers can be found in every cave of the Mogao Grottoes. In Buddhism, the lotus symbolizes purity and enlightenment. It is believed that one’s soul can attain rebirth through the lotus, leading to the blissful Western Pure Land. Within the Mogao Grottoes, lotus flowers adorn the background, embellishing figures of bodhisattvas and celestial beings, embodying the sacred and immaculate nature of Buddhas and bodhisattvas. Hence, the lotus is the quintessential flower representing Buddhism. Apart from the lotus, another significant motif is the honeysuckle, also known as Jin Hua (golden-silver flower).  It is an important decorative symbol in Dunhuang art, introduced alongside Buddhist art in China as a decorative floral theme.  The rise of honeysuckle patterns in China occurred nearly simultaneously with the spread of Buddhism.  Its extensive use in Buddhist decorations during the Northern Dynasties influenced secular ornamentation at that time.  Honeysuckle blooms during summer, transitioning from white to yellow after budding, shedding old leaves in late autumn, and promptly producing new leaves.  It endures even in the harshest winter conditions, quietly thriving in the wild with minimal requirements of water and soil.  As a result, the honeysuckle pattern found abundant application in Buddhist-related decorations, drawing from its persistent growth characteristics. Furthermore, the motif of the “Baoxiang Flower,” also known as Baoxianhua or Baolianhua, is another traditional auspicious pattern in Dunhuang decorations.  It is one of the auspicious Three Treasures and was prevalent during China’s Sui and Tang Dynasties.  The concept of “Baoxiang” originates from Buddhism, where it refers to a respectful term for Buddhist images.  The Baoxiang Flower represents an idealized form of purity, grace, and beauty.

                                              In addition to these captivating decorative patterns, the craftsmanship of Lang Hong ceramics is also deserving of praise. Firstly, the full name of Lang Hong is “Langyao Red,” also known as “Gem Red” or “Ox Blood Red.” It is one of the most vibrant colours in traditional Chinese precious copper red glazes. Lang Hong glaze is achieved by using copper as a colouring agent and firing it at a high temperature of 1300°C. Since copper elements easily evaporate at high temperatures, the range of colour expression is limited. The firing process demands strict control over the atmosphere and temperature, and the outcome is greatly affected by external factors, making it a highly challenging process to successfully produce Lang Hong ceramics. Lang Hong glaze boasts a smooth and translucent surface, resembling glass, with crackled patterns resembling cow hair texture.  The glaze exhibits a deep and vivid colour, resembling freshly congealed ox blood with its brilliant crimson hue, symbolizing auspiciousness, and wealth.  Revered as a “treasure among a thousand kilns,” the red-glazed porcelain of Lang Hong showcases a distinctive ethnic style, shining like a dazzling gem in the history of world ceramics.  The colour red, known for its auspiciousness and affluence, has elevated Lang Hong ceramics to a radiant and remarkable masterpiece in the realm of ceramic art.

                                              Enamel, on the other hand, is a decorative technique that involves transplanting the cloisonné enamel method onto a porcelain body as an overglaze colour decoration. Enamel decoration on porcelain, known as “Fàlángcǎi” in Chinese, entails painting colourful patterns on the porcelain surface and then firing it at high temperatures to fuse the colours with the porcelain, achieving a durable and splendid design. These patterns often feature exquisite themes such as flowers, birds, figures, and landscapes, reflecting the essence of traditional Chinese culture and art. The process of creating enamel decorations is extremely intricate and complex, requiring skilled and experienced craftsmen. First, the porcelain prototype is made, and then special mineral pigments are used to paint patterns on its surface. Once the painting is completed, a series of firing processes follow, during which the temperature and timing for both the porcelain and the enamel colours are crucial factors. Improper temperature or timing can result in cracks in the porcelain or unstable colours. Enamel decoration is considered a treasure in traditional Chinese craftsmanship, representing the wisdom and skills of ancient Chinese artisans.

                                              This hat cup showcases exquisite Lang Hong craftsmanship, with intricate and delicate Dunhuang patterns that carry profound symbolism.

                                            • Hand Painted Lotus Ba Bao GaiwanHand Painted Lotus Ba Bao Gaiwan
                                              $749.99

                                              The style of this super beautiful Gaiwan is Ming, using the underglaze blue technique, and entirely handcrafted and hand painted. The pattern features very traditional Chinese patterns including intertwining lotus and ‘Ba Bao’.

                                              The “Ba Bao,” also known as the “Buddhist Eight Treasures” or “Eight Auspicious Treasures,” represent eight auspicious objects symbolizing the power of Buddhism. These symbols manifest through the perception of eight types of consciousness: eyes, ears, nose, tongue, body, mind, intellect, and consciousness. They are depicted in various patterns and motifs as decorations in Buddhist art.

                                              During the Qing Dynasty, particularly during the reign of Emperor Qianlong, these eight auspicious symbols were transformed into three-dimensional display items. They were often placed together with ritual vessels in temples. The eight auspicious symbols are abbreviated as follows: Conch Shell, Dharma Wheel, Umbrella, Canopy, Lotus Flower, Vase, Fish, and Endless Knot.

                                              According to Buddhist beliefs, each of the “Eight Auspicious Symbols” has specific symbolic meanings:

                                              • Conch Shell: Represents the auspicious sound of the Dharma, spreading throughout the world as a symbol of good fortune.
                                              • Dharma Wheel: Signifies the endless cycle of Buddhist teachings, symbolizing the continuity of life.
                                              • Umbrella: Symbolizes protection and the ability to shield and safeguard all sentient beings.
                                              • Canopy: Represents the protection of the world and purification of the universe, symbolizing liberation from poverty and illness.
                                              • Lotus Flower: Symbolizes purity and divine birth, representing the rejection of contamination.
                                              • Vase: Represents the perfection of wisdom and fulfillment, symbolizing the achievement of success.
                                              • Fish: Symbolizes liveliness, health, and vitality, serving as a sign of good luck and warding off evil spirits.
                                              • Endless Knot: Represents the interconnectedness and endless nature of all things, symbolizing longevity, and a hundred years of life.

                                              The construction of these symbols focuses on using auspicious objects as the main decorative elements, with their forms often being symmetrical or balanced. Some are complemented by flowing ribbons, while others are placed on a lotus pedestal, creating a harmonious and coherent effect among the different auspicious treasures.

                                              During the Tang and Song Dynasties, the Eight Auspicious Symbols were introduced to the central plains with the spread of Tibetan Buddhism. By the Yuan Dynasty, they began to appear on silk, ceramics, gold, and silver items. In the Ming and Qing Dynasties, the application of the Eight Auspicious Symbols became even more widespread, involving lacquerware, furniture, architectural decorations, and other areas of craftsmanship.

                                              The delicate brushstrokes and intricate detailing of the painting on this Gaiwan create a distinct sense of aesthetic appeal. The soft and elegant shade of underglaze blue, along with a hint of faint tin glaze, gives it a graceful and ethereal beauty under the light. This Gaiwan exudes a simple yet elegant charm, reminiscent of the style of imitation Ming, making it truly captivating and irresistible.