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The Chinese are quite famous for their love for tea ever since ancient times. China is home to huge varieties and sub-varieties of tea that are exported all across the world.

In addition to being an important beverage, the Chinese also prefer consuming hot tea along with their meals as well. In other words, every restaurant, eatery, and food outlet in China does serve tea.

Not only do they serve natural teas but also blended varieties and customized options as well. Here are 5 popular types of tea that you’re sure to find in an average restaurant in China.

  1. Blended teas:

As the name suggests, these teas a unique blend of multiple different varieties that restaurants often sell as their own specialty. It can a mix of black & green tea or green & oolong tea. Other varieties of tea that are sold as blended teas include jasmine tea, flower tea, and white tea.

Pu-erh tea and chrysanthemum tea are also quite popular within the Chinese folks when it comes to savoring blended teas.

  1. Pu-erh tea:

Coupled with a rich, musky, earthy taste, the Pu-erh tea is one of the most popular and highly sought-after tea types in Chinese restaurants. It is grown and cultivated in China’s Yunnan province and exported all over the globe.

However, Pu-erh tea is only available in selective high-end restaurants since it is quite the delicacy and also quite on the expensive side.

  1. Green tea:

Chinese green tea is famous all across the world for its unique flavor and health benefits. Chinese restaurants often serve hot green tea as a regular beverage along with meals.

It is quite pale yellowish-green in color sometimes with a vibrant texture as well. However, Chinese green tea has a distinct grassy taste with a bit of vegetal flavor along with it.

  1. Oolong tea:

Oolong tea resembles black tea but is slightly lighter in color. It has a roasted aroma, coupled with woody, musky flavor but less bitter than black tea.

  1. Jasmine tea:

This is not a naturally occurring tea type but quite a customized one. It is made by brewing some jasmine leaves in green or black tea that gives the beverage a distinct, unique flavor.

The flavor and aroma can be described as perfumey or flowery and it forms quite a popular delicacy in most Chinese restaurants.

Summing it up:

The Chinese and their tea go hand in hand, one not existing without the other. Not only do they have the best varieties of tea but also the Chinese restaurants are quite full of skillful people who know how to make a tea taste good.

So, the next time you’re in China, you know just what you need to do!

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